Mississippi Valley State University

April 24, 2014

Biology (BI)

BIOLOGY-BI

BI 111. GENERAL BIOLOGY I (ZOOLOGY). The fundamentals of animal life, with an emphasis on anatomy, physiology, behavior, evolution and genetics with special reference to animal contributions to ecosystems and to humans. Live animals, handled in compliance with rules of the institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, are used in the classroom and laboratory for instruction and to demonstrate ethical and appropriate care of living animals used for instructional purposes. 4

BI 112. GENERAL BIOLOGY II (BOTANY). An introduction to diversity of plants from the simplest to the most complex. Study of plant classification, life cycles, structure functions, non-vascular embryophytes, seedless vascular plants, and the spermatophytes. Salient features of each division with regard to cellular organization, anatomy, relations of structures to functions, development, genetics, and evolution and their role in ecosystems. 4

BI 191-92. SEMINAR. Discussion of relevant research, scientific papers, and current events in biology and related natural science disciplines. Interrelatedness of the disciplines of natural sciences is emphasized through joint meetings of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health at the same level (freshman biology-chemistry-environmental health seminars, for example). Relevance and significance of the understanding of the natural principles in proper context and handling of personal and societal issues are a major focus of the discussions. Group and individual academic advisement sessions are arranged at appropriate times. 1.

BI 291-92. SEMINAR. Discussion of relevant research, scientific papers, and current events in biology and related natural science disciplines. Interrelatedness of the disciplines of natural sciences is emphasized through joint meetings of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health at the same level (freshman biology-chemistry-environmental health seminars, for example). Relevance and significance of the understanding of the natural principles in proper context and handling of personal and societal issues are a major focus of the discussions. Group and individual academic advisement sessions are arranged at appropriate times. 1.

BI 301 ANATOMY. A course in human anatomy including cell structure, organs, and organ systems and their relationship to the functions of the body. Prerequisites: BI 111; CH 111-112. 4

BI 302. PHYSIOLOGY. A course in human physiology including cell structure, body chemistry, organs, and organ systems and their relationship to the functions of the body. Prerequisites: BI 111; CH 111-112. 4

BI 311. GENETICS. An introduction to genetic principles in relation to the mechanisms of inheritance. Role of genetics in the development of biotechnology and human welfare is analyzed. Prerequisites: BI 111 and B 112. 4

BI 312. MICROBIOLOGY. The study of the near omnipresence of generally unseen or unnoticed microbes, with the heaviest emphasis on bacteria with respect to their morphology, structure, nutrition, physiology, culture, and classification. The role of microorganisms in their native habitats, especially in the health and disease of humans, domestic animals, and crop plants. Prerequisites: BI 111-112; CH 301-302. 4

BI 321. MICROTECHNIQUE. The preparation of plant and animal tissues for microscopic examination, including the fixing, sectioning, and staining procedures. Prerequisites: BI 111, 112. 4

BI 323. EMBRYOLOGY. Study of the origin and development of multicellular organisms across the evolutionary spectrum but with special focus on vertebrates, and how the ontogenetic development sheds light on phylogenetic lineage. Prerequisites: BI 111-112. 4

BI 331. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. The morphology, anatomy, and classification of chordates with special emphasis on mammals. Prerequisites: BI 111; 301-302. 4

BI 355. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR SCIENTISTS. The study and practice of scientific writing on topics of biological interest. Exemplary abstracts, reports, articles, and reviews will be examined and used as guides for preparing manuscripts on assigned topics using productivity tools such as word-processing, spreadsheet, database management, data reduction, presentation, and analysis software. Prerequisites: BI 111-112, CH 111-112. Recommended. 3

BI 370. EVOLUTION. The study of the development of the evolutionary theory from pre-Darwin to the present time and the current status of the theory of evolution. Origin of life and the causes of biological diversity, as well as the relationship of humans to other biota, will be discussed. Prerequisites: BI 111-112. 3

BI 391-92. SEMINAR. Discussion of relevant research, scientific papers, and current events in biology and related natural science disciplines. Interrelatedness of the disciplines of natural sciences is emphasized through joint meetings of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health at the same level (freshman biology-chemistry-environmental health seminars, for example). Relevance and significance of the understanding of the natural principles in proper context and handling of personal and societal issues are a major focus of the discussions. Group and individual academic advisement sessions are arranged at appropriate times. 1.

BI 401 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. The study of animals without backbones, their evolution, structure, physiology and development and their relationship to ecosystems and humans. Economic importance of invertebrate parasites and pests will be examined in depth. Prerequisite: BI 111. 4

BI 402. PLANT ANATOMY. The study of plant cell structure & function, water relations, nutrition, metabolism, pigments and photosynthesis, plant hormones, and translocation transpiration, verbalization and dormancy. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 111, CH 112. 4

BI 403. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. A study of mineral nutrition, water relations, plant growth hormones, metabolism, and development of higher plants. Prerequisites: BI 112, and CH 111-112. 4

BI 408. ENTOMOLOGY. The study of morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy of insects, including the health and economic impact and control of insects. Prerequisite: BI 111. 4

BI 410. CELL BIOLOGY. Microscopic and ultramicroscopic details of cells of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The role of cells in the overall organization, metabolism, functions and genetics of living organisms in healthy and diseased states. Prerequisites: BI 111-112, CH 301-302. 4

BI 411. ECOLOGY. Study of the major biomes of the world with emphasis on the relationship between the living and non-living components of ecosystems. The significance of biodiversity in relation to fundamental ecological principles is critically examined. Prerequisites: BI 111-112. 4

BI 421. VERTEBRATE HISTOLGOY. Study of the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of vertebrate animals. Prerequisites: BI 111, 301-302. 4

BI 422. IMMUNOLOGY. The study of mammalian immunity of disease agents. The response of cells, tissues, and body of antigens is discussed. Prerequisites: BI 111, 312. 4

BI 430. AQUATIC ECOLOGY. Introduces students to the study of aquatic environments. The emphasis of this course is examination of the life forms and environmental variables that comprise aquatic ecosystems. Ecological concepts, water chemistry, water flow, and the variety of aquatic life will be studied. Prerequisites: BI 111-112. 4

BI 431. AQUATIC BIOLOGY. Builds on the ecological concepts presented in Aquatic Ecology by focusing on how those parameters affect fish. The orientation of this course is towards fish biology, fish physiology, and interactions between fish and their environment. Prerequisites: BI 111-112. 4

BI 455. SENIOR PROJECT. Written and oral report and defense of laboratory or field based investigation or of a literature review on a topic of biological interest, developed and prepared under the supervision of a faculty member as the mentor, and approved by two additional faculty readers. Substantial progress on the selected topic is expected prior to permission to register for credit toward the project work. Students in the biology education program preparing to teach in secondary schools must choose a laboratory or field-based investigation as the senior project. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3

BI 470. PARASITOLOGY. The study of the parasites of human, domestic, and wild animals. The study focuses on micro-anatomy, reproduction, relations with the host organisms, role as vectors of disease causing microbes, life cycles, and control of representative parasites. Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 301 and BI 302. 

BI 491-92. SEMINAR. Discussion of relevant research, scientific papers, and current events in biology and related natural science disciplines. Interrelatedness of the disciplines of natural sciences is emphasized through joint meetings of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health at the same level (freshman biology-chemistry-environmental health seminars, for example). Relevance and significance of the understanding of the natural principles in proper context and handling of personal and societal issues are a major focus of the discussions. Group and individual academic advisement sessions are arranged at appropriate times. 1.

BI 495. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Independent study of a topic of student interest in the biological sciences under the supervision of a faculty member. Topic and details of the progress expected is determined prior to registration. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3